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Natural Heritage

Natural Heritage
Preserving the natural patrimony is the most inexpensive and efficient environmental economics. The term natural heritage derives from the French "patrimoine naturel", the totality of natural assets, including those of historical, cultural or scenic beauty. It give us understanding the importance of natural environment: where we came from, what we do and how we will be. Our lives are connected to the landscapes of our daily lives, as well as we keep the memories of places we went. The destruction of these landscapes cause irreversible environmental damage, and are an insult to our memory, causing loss of quality of life.

UnitingPeopleToProtectThePlanet

UnitingPeopleToProtectThePlanet
EarthHour 2017 25 March 8:30PM *LocalTime

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Thursday, May 10, 2012

130 WORLD LEADERS CONFIRMED: LAST SPRINT TOWARDS RIO+20




130 WORLD LEADERS CONFIRMED: LAST SPRINT TOWARDS RIO+20

ON 24 APRIL 2012.
Over 130 Heads of State, Vice Presidents, Heads of Government, and deputy Prime Ministers are currently inscribed on the speakers list for the Rio+20 Conference, from 20-22 June.

Rio+20 is expected to be a tremendous example of wide-ranging popular participation: over 50,000 people are expected to attend the Conference and numerous side events in Rio de Janeiro, including thousands of business CEOs, parliamentarians, mayors, NGO leaders, academics, senior UN officials, representatives from miscellaneous groups and journalists.

As the world engages in the last sprint towards the Rio+20, time is ticking for the negotiations of the Conference's Outcome document that will resume from 23 April to 4 May in UN Headquarters in New York. The 19-page "zero draft" issued in January was condensed from 6,000 pages of submissions from member states and other stakeholders. A large number of proposals were made by governments during intense negotiations in March. The draft was then significantly expanded, including with suggested alternate language by the Co-Chairs, bringing the text to some 270 pages. 


The revised draft identified 26 critical areas for action, including: water, energy, food, jobs, cities, oceans, disaster preparedness, poverty eradication, tourism, transport, climate change, sustainable consumption and production, lands, chemicals and forests, among others.